From time to time, everyone carries out such a procedure as decluttering in their home. Of course, you need to get rid of unnecessary things, otherwise there will not be enough space to store them. How to do it most effectively? Very often we feel sorry for throwing things away. Some are still in excellent condition, although we don't use them often, or we don't use them at all. Others are associated with cherished memories.

The Swedes have an unequivocal answer on how to part with all this. In this country, an interesting method called "dying cleaning" is actively used. It helps to quickly get rid of unnecessary things and not regret anything. What is the essence of the method?

Although the name of this method sounds quite scary, it always works well. The method was taken from the book of the same name by 80-year-old artist Margaret Magnussen "The Art of Dying Cleaning". In it, the author describes an unusual way that helps to get rid of all unnecessary things and declutter the apartment.

Magnusen advises trying to look at everything in your home from a different angle. Imagine what will happen to all these things when you are gone. Ask yourself a few questions, like this: Will your children and grandchildren need them or will they make anyone happy? If you answered "yes" to at least one of these questions, you can wait and not throw away a specific item, but if "no", it belongs in the trash.

How to put things in order in the house / Photo: pixabay.com

You need to understand that items that may have a certain value for you will turn out to be ordinary rubbish for others. And all this will have to be taken out and thrown away by children and grandchildren. So why not do it now. That's exactly what the people of Sweden think.

Of course, you should not go to extremes. No one here thinks about dying at 30 and throws away everything they use. According to the "dying cleaning" method, you need to exclude only those things that you have not used for a long time, have never used or those that do not bring you happiness.

Magnusen also advises you to stop buying cheap items on sale, because all these things only clutter the house you live in.

Don't rush yourself. The decluttering process can be slow, so you don't need to try to clean the entire apartment in one evening. Some things (new or in good condition) can be offered to friends, acquaintances, donated to charity. It's much better than just throwing them away. The last thing Magnusen advises is to sort out old postcards and photographs. Otherwise, you risk getting bogged down in memories.